‘Their Finest’: Film Review | TIFF 2016


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Courtesy of TIFF
Gemma Arterton in ‘Their Finest’
A disarming movie about the uplifting power of movies.

Gemma Arterton and Sam Claflin play reluctant screenwriting collaborators on a WWII film designed to lift the British public’s spirits and coax America into the conflict in Lone Scherfig’s period comedy-drama.

Near the end of the stealth charmer Their Finest, the accidental screenwriter played by Gemma Arterton slips into a movie theater amongst the London public during the Blitz to watch the morale-building British Ministry of Information propaganda film she has helped to shape. Director Lone Scherfig pushes every required button to evoke the style of the era in this mini-narrative recounting a Dunkirk rescue mission by patriotic civilians — the quivering lips, the plucky determination, the humble heroism and the lush swell of sorrow and stirring sentiment. But don’t be surprised if you find yourself getting misty-eyed during this lovely sequence as you surrender to every hoary cliché.

As proto-feminist protagonists go, Catrin Cole (Arterton) may be a little meek for modern tastes. But her quiet assertiveness seems truer to the period than it would have had she been given a contemporary spin and a lot of boldly declarative speeches. It also allows Arteron to explore the inner strength and resolve of this warm-hearted woman via subtle strokes that yield affecting rewards.

The performance acquires heft also from its position at the center of a sterling ensemble of British talent, from rising stars like Sam Claflin to veterans like Bill Nighy, Helen McCrory, Richard E. Grant and Jeremy Irons, the latter in a very funny self-satirizing cameo. Their Finest doesn’t match the delicacy of Danish director Scherfig’s best English-language feature, An Education. But just as that 2009 film captured Britain during the transitional time of the 1960s through the experiences of a young woman in emotional and intellectual bloom, Scherfig’s latest does something similar with the 1940s, albeit through a far softer lens of sweet nostalgia.

Adapted by Gaby Chiappe from a 2009 novel by Lissa Evans, the story is written with a light touch but also a keen sense of the mood of domestic Britain in those darkest hours of 1940, when London was riddled with bombsites. That reality is reflected in the gloomy paintings of Ellis (Jack Huston), whose work is deemed too brutal and depressing for use by the War Office. Needing income, his Welsh transplant wife Catrin applies to the Ministry of Information for what she thinks is a secretarial position. But the head of the Film Division (Richard E. Grant) says her copywriting skills make her ideal to bring the women’s perspective to pictures whose mandate is “authenticity with optimism.”

Scherfig uses amusing recreations of such films early on to show how low the bar had been set, with clips of fretful housewives pegging out washing while turning to a cup of tea to calm their fears for husbands and sons off at war. Assigned to work (at a lower pay rate) with male co-writers Tom Buckley (Claflin) and Raymond Parfitt (Paul Ritter), Catrin learns that women’s dialogue in those wartime reels is referred to as “the slop.”

Their chance to have an impact on flagging national morale comes with a project based on the true story of mousy twin sisters Rose and Lily Starling (Lily and Francesca Knight), who piloted their drunken father’s boat from Southend to Dunkirk to rescue wounded British soldiers. Sent to research the story, Catrin is crushed to find that newspaper accounts were greatly embellished. But her growing understanding of how the film industry works prompts her to write the story the public needs to see.

While Ellis want

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